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  • Writer's pictureSylvain Richer de Forges

Comparative analysis of waste management in south east asia

Exploring Waste Management in Southeast Asia: Landfills vs. Incinerators



As our region continues to grapple with the challenges of waste management, let's take a closer look at the numbers behind two prominent disposal methods: Landfills and Incinerators.


Southeast Asia is home to diverse nations, each with its own approach to waste management. Here's a snapshot of the situation in some countries:


Indonesia: With its vast archipelago, Indonesia relies heavily on landfills, housing over 300 in 2021 [source: World Bank]. However, they've also been increasing investments in waste-to-energy facilities.


Singapore: Known for its cutting-edge waste management, Singapore primarily uses incineration, processing over 90% of its waste this way [source: National Environment Agency]. They have only one active landfill, the Semakau Landfill.


Vietnam: Landfills have been the dominant choice, but Vietnam is exploring incineration options to address its growing waste problem [source: Vietnam Investment Review]. Approximately 60% of waste is disposed of in landfills.


Malaysia: Landfills remain prevalent, with over 180 in operation, but the government has been promoting waste-to-energy projects as an alternative [source: Ministry of Housing and Local Government].


Thailand: Landfills are widespread, with over 1,400 across the country, but Thailand is actively seeking to reduce waste through recycling and energy recovery [source: Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment].


The key takeaway is that while many Southeast Asian countries still heavily depend on landfills, there's a growing trend towards adopting incineration and waste-to-energy solutions as they seek sustainable waste management practices.


Sustainability is crucial for our future, and it's heartening to see these nations taking steps to address their waste challenges. Let's continue to support initiatives that promote a cleaner, greener Southeast Asia!


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